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Rep Mark DeSaulnier

photo of Rep Mark DeSaulnier

  • (D CA-11)
  • 327 Cannon House Office Building
  • 202-225-2095

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Voted with us 96% over lifetime

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Afghanistan

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that calls on the President to expand the scope of the mission in Afghanistan (RC #212)
H.Amdt.1036 to H.R.4909. Rep. Keith Ellison’s (D-MN) amendment to the NDAA would have removed language calling on the President to expand the scope of the mission in Afghanistan. The Afghanistan War is the longest war in American history, and we should be working to end the U.S. military mission in Afghanistan rather than expand it. Failed, 131-292.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark

Arms sales

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Preventing the transfer of cluster bombs to Saudi Arabia (RC #327)
H.Amdt.1212 to H.R.5293. Rep. John Conyers’ (D-MI) amendment would have blocked funds from being used to transfer or authorize the transfer of cluster munitions to Saudi Arabia. Failed, 204-216.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark

Counterterrorism

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting funds from being used for the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) after April 30, 2017 (RC #330)
H.Amdt.1216 to H.R.5293. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have prohibited funds from being used for the 2001 AUMF after April 30, 2017. With no expiration date, no geographic limitations, and vague language around acceptable targets, the 2001 AUMF has served as a blank check for war for the executive branch, allowing Congress to shirk one of its most important duties: to debate and vote on whether or not we go to war. Failed, 146-274.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting funds from being used for engaging U.S. Armed Forces in combat operations in Iraq or Syria until an Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) authorizing those operations is passed (RC #329)
H.Amdt.1215 to H.R.5293. Rep. Jim McGovern’s (D-MA) amendment would have prohibited funds from being used for the engagement of U.S. Armed Forces in any combat operation in Iraq or Syria until an AUMF is enacted authorizing such operations. Failed, 135-285.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Repealing the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) (RC #210)
H.Amdt.1033 to H.R.4909. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have repealed the outdated, 2001 AUMF. With no expiration date, no geographic limitations, and vague language around acceptable targets, the 2001 AUMF has served as a blank check for war for the executive branch, allowing Congress to shirk one of its most important duties: to debate and vote on whether or not we go to war. Failed, 138-285.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Withdrawing troops from Iraq and Syria (RC #370)
H.Con.Res.55. Rep. Jim McGovern’s (D-MA) resolution would have directed the President to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq and Syria who were deployed on or after August 7, 2014, other than troops needed to protect U.S. diplomatic missions and personnel, within 30 days of passage of the resolution, or if the President decided it was not safe to withdraw troops in that period, no later than December 31, 2015. Failed, 139-288.
Jun 17, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Sunsetting the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) (RC #347)
H.Amdt.482 to H.R.2685. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have blocked funding for the 2001 AUMF after December 31, 2015. Lee explained that the 2001 AUMF had (at the time) been used “more than 30 times to justify military action and other activities, including warrantless surveillance and wiretapping, indefinite detention practices at GTMO, targeted killing operations using lethal drones, and the open-ended expansion of military operations abroad, which have nothing to do with the original congressional intent.” Failed, 157-270.
Jun 11, 2015FailedYeacheckmark

International cooperation

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score

Iran

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Impeding sanctions relief for Iran (RC #533)
H.R.3457. Rep. Patrick Meehan’s (R-PA) resolution would have prevented the lifting of nuclear related sanctions against Iran -- sanctions the the Iran Agreement specifies will be lifted -- until Iran paid for judgements against it levied in U.S. courts for acts of terrorism. Not only was this bill designed to block implementation of the Iran Nuclear Agreement, it was also redundant since the agreement did nothing to prevent terrorism related sanctions against Iran. The Senate never voted on this resolution. Passed, 251-173.
Oct 01, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Vote for approval of the Iran Nuclear Agreement (RC #493)
H.R.3461. Despite the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act not requiring approval for the Iran Agreement to move forward, republican leadership held a vote of approval in order to demonstrate that a majority of Congress opposed the agreement and to put democrats on record in favor of the agreement so they could use that against them in the 2016 election. Failed, 162-269.
Sep 11, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Claiming that the President did not comply with the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act (RC #492)
H.Res.411. Rep. Mike Pompeo’s (R-KS) resolution claimed that the President did not comply with the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act because he did not submit to Congress agreements made between the government of Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The resolution claimed that the IAEA agreements with Iran constituted side agreements within the Iran Nuclear Agreement, while the Obama administration contended that those agreements were separate from the Iran Nuclear Agreement. The resolution claimed that because the President had supposedly not followed the terms of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act, the 60-day congressional review period had not actually started. Had that been the case, implementation of the agreement would have been delayed, which Iran would have likely see as a violation of the agreement. Passed, 245-186.
Sep 10, 2015PassedNaycheckmark

Iraq

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score

Libya

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score

Nuclear weapons

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Cutting $75 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #309)
H.Amdt.1187 to H.R.5293. Rep. Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) amendment would have cut $75,802,000 from the LRSO, a new nuclear cruise missile that is redundant, expensive, and destabilizing. Failed, 159-261.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would prevent the dismantlement of nuclear warheads that were retired in 2007 (RC #237)
H.Amdt.231 to H.R.1735. Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) amendment would have removed language from the NDAA that delayed for 5 years the dismantlement of nuclear warheads that were retired in 2007. Nadler explained the absurdity of the language that his amendment sought to strike: “We have about 5,000 active nuclear warheads, and 2,000 would suffice to destroy the entire world. Why waste money maintaining retired warheads beyond the 5,000 active warheads sufficient to destroy the world two and a half times over?” Failed, 178-242.
May 15, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting funds for new nuclear submarines from being drawn from the Navy’s slush fund, and returning slush fund money to the regular Navy budget (RC #235)
H.Amdt.227 to H.R.1735. Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s (D-OR) amendment would have required funding for the new Ohio-class nuclear submarines to come from the Navy’s regular budget as opposed to a Navy slush fund called the National Sea-Based Deterrent Fund. The amendment also would have transferred money from the National Sea-Based Deterrent Fund back into the regular Navy budget. Like the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget, the Sea-Based Deterrence Fund allows the Navy to circumvent legislated budget caps and reduces transparency. Failed, 43-375.
May 15, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Limiting funding for implementation of the New START Treaty (RC #234)
H.Amdt.226 to H.R.1735. Rep. Doug Lamborn’s (R-CO) amendment prevented Department of Defense funding from being used to implement the New Start Treaty, an agreement between the U.S. and Russia to reduce their nuclear arsenals. Passed, 235-182.
May 15, 2015Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Cutting $25 million from the life extension program for the warhead for the new nuclear cruise missile (RC #204)
H.Amdt.181 to H.R.2028. Rep. John Garamendi’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut $25 million from a life extension program for the W80 warhead for a new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO). The bill that this amendment applied to accelerated the life extension program for the W80 warhead by two years, moving the acquisition date from 2027 to 2025, despite the fact that the current nuclear armed cruise missile and its accompanying warhead aren’t slated for retirement until the 2030s. In other words, the House voted to waste taxpayer dollars on accelerating plans to build a redundant and destabilizing nuclear cruise missile and warhead. Failed, 149-272.
May 01, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Cutting $167 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #203)
H.Amdt.180 to H.R.2028. Rep. Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) amendment would have cut $167,050,000 from the LRSO, a new nuclear cruise missile that is redundant, expensive, and destabilizing. Failed, 164-257.
May 01, 2015FailedYeacheckmark

Pentagon spending

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting the use of Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funds for anything other than contingency operations (RC #323)
H.Amdt.1206 to H.R.5293. The OCO budget is a Pentagon slush fund that allows the Pentagon to surpass budget caps that other government programs are bound to, and allows the Pentagon to be less transparent in how it spends taxpayer money. Rep. Mick Mulvaney’s (R-SC) amendment would have prevented OCO funding from being used for normal Pentagon operations in an attempt to reduce the OCO’s utility as a slush fund. Failed, 112-306.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting the use of funds for transferring prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to their country of origin or any other foreign country (RC #319)
H.Amdt.1202 to H.R.5293. Rep. Doug Lamborn’s (R-CO) amendment prohibits the use of funds for transferring prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to their countries of origin or any other foreign country. This amendment combined with language in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that prevents funds from being used to transfer Guantanamo Bay prisoners to the U.S. makes it virtually impossible to close the Guantanamo Bay Prison with money appropriated for Fiscal Year 2017. Passed, 245-175.
Jun 16, 2016Agreed ToNaycheckmark
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2017 (RC #216)
H.R.4909. The FY 2017 NDAA includes incredibly problematic programs like Pentagon slush funds (namely the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget and the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund), the F-35 fighter jet, and the new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO), among others. Passed, 277-147.
May 19, 2016PassedNaycheckmark
Reducing the Pentagon slush fund by roughly $9.44 billion (RC #213)
H.Amdt.1037 to H.R.4909. Rep. Keith Ellison’s (D-MN) amendment would have cut $9,440,300,000 from the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget. The OCO budget is a Pentagon slush fund that allows the Pentagon to surpass budget caps that other government programs are bound to, and allows the Pentagon to be less transparent in how it spends taxpayer money. Failed, 132-289.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Reducing the base Department of Defense budget by 1% (RC #211)
H.Amdt.1034 to H.R.4909. Rep. Jared Polis’ (D-CO) amendment would have reduced the base Department of Defense budget by 1%, excluding military/reserve/National Guard personnel and the Defense Health Program account. Failed, 63-360.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would prevent funds from being used to close Guantanamo Bay Prison (RC #204)
H.Amdt.1016 to H.R.4909. Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) amendment would have removed sections from the NDAA that prohibit funds from being used to transfer prisoners from Guantanamo Bay Prison to the United States, and from being used to construct or expand any facilities in the U.S. for the purpose of housing Guantanamo Bay detainees. Failed, 163-259.
May 18, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the Department of Defense Appropriations Act that would prohibit the transfer of funds to the Navy’s slush fund (RC #339)
H.Amdt.471 to H.R.2685. Rep. Randy Forbes’ (R-VA) amendment to the Department of Defense Appropriations bill removed language that would have prohibited the transfer of funds to the Navy’s slush fund, known as the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund. Passed 321-111.
Jun 11, 2015Agreed ToYeaxmark
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2016 (RC #239)
H.R.1735. The FY 2016 NDAA includes incredibly problematic programs like Pentagon slush funds (namely the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget and the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund), the F-35 fighter jet, and the new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO), among others. Passed, 269-151.
May 15, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Reducing the required number of operational aircraft carriers that the Navy must maintain from 11 to 10 (RC #228)
H.Amdt.217 to H.R.1735. Rep. Jared Polis’ (D-CO) amendment would have lowered the required number of operational aircraft carriers the Navy must maintain from 11 to 10. Failed, 60-363.
May 14, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the Consolidated Appropriations Act that would use the Pentagon’s slush fund to provide funding for certain military construction projects (RC #186)
H.Amdt.125 to H.R.2029. Rep. Mike Mulvaney’s (R-SC) amendment would have removed language from the Consolidated Appropriations Act that provided funding for certain military construction projects from the Pentagon’s slush fund, known as the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget. Failed, 190-231.
Apr 30, 2015FailedYeacheckmark

Syria

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Preventing funds from being used to arm and/or train Syrian rebels (RC #328)
H.Amdt.1214 to H.R.5293. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s (D-HI) amendment would have prevented funds from being used for arming and/or training Syrian rebels. Failed, 135-283.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Shutting our doors to refugees from Iraq and Syria (RC #643)
H.R.4038. Rep. Michael McCaul’s (R-TX) resolution, the so-called “American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act,” would have required the directors of National Intelligence, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FBI certify to Congress that each individual refugee is not a security threat. The requirement that these directors personally sign off on each refugee from Iraq and Syria, of the thousands of Iraqi and Syrian refugees that the U.S. plans to accept, would have wrapped the refugee resettlement program in red tape and effectively prevented refugees from those countries from entering the U.S. Even if these requirements wouldn’t have made the resettlement process impossible, increasing the barriers to refugee resettlement is unnecessary. Refugees are already the most heavily vetted population to enter the country, going through a screening process that on average takes 18-24 months. The Senate never voted on this resolution. Passed, 289-137.
Nov 19, 2015PassedNaycheckmark