Know The Score

Rep Mike Honda

photo of Rep Michael Honda

  • (D CA-17)
  • 1713 Longworth House Office Building
  • 202-225-2631
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Voted with us 94% over lifetime

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Afghanistan

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that calls on the President to expand the scope of the mission in Afghanistan (RC #212)
H.Amdt.1036 to H.R.4909. Rep. Keith Ellison’s (D-MN) amendment to the NDAA would have removed language calling on the President to expand the scope of the mission in Afghanistan. The Afghanistan War is the longest war in American history, and we should be working to end the U.S. military mission in Afghanistan rather than expand it. Failed, 131-292.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Blocking funding for wasteful ANSF training (RC #395)
This amendment blocked funding to train the Afghan National Security Forces to use helicopters provided by Rosoboronexport, a company that provides arms to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction reports that the forces don't have the capacity to use the helicopters. Passed, 333-93.
Jul 24, 2013Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Wasteful funds for unprepared Afghan Security Forces (RC #391)
Rep. Garamendi's (D-CA) amendment would have cut $2.6 billion in wasteful funds for the Afghan Security Forces. Much of the money has been wasted or is intended for equipment the ANSF is not prepared to use. Failed, 150-276.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Overwhelming support to exit Afghanistan (RC #226)
The House voted overwhelmingly in favor of this amendment supporting accelerated withdrawal from Afghanistan and urging a congressional vote to approve any decision to keep troops on the ground after 2014. Passed, 305-121.
Jun 13, 2013Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Reflecting the president's drawdown plan (RC #494)
President Obama has repeatedly said that troop withdrawals would continue at a steady pace after the surge troops came home. Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA)'s amendment would have cut $12.6 billion from the war budget to reflect a steady drawdown. Failed, 137-278
Jul 19, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Funding a responsible withdrawal (part 2) (RC #485)
After billions of dollars spent on more than a decade of war, Rep. Lee's amendment would have limited war funding to the amount needed for a safe, responsible withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan. Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) offered a similar amendment to the Defense Appropriations bill. Failed, 107-312
Jul 19, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Funding a responsible withdrawal (part 1) (RC #264)
After billions of dollars spent on more than a decade of war, Rep. Barbara Lee's (D-CA) amendment would have limited war funding to the amount needed for a safe, responsible withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan.
May 17, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Speeding up combat troop withdrawal (RC #503)
In June, President Obama announced that he planned to transition to Afghan control of security in 2014. Rep. John Garamendi’s (D-CA) amendment would have sped up the transition, requiring withdrawal of combat troops by the end of 2012. Failed, 133-295
Jul 07, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Saving money by starting military withdrawal (RC #502)
Rep. Barbara Lee’s amendment would have cut $33 billion from the war in Afghanistan, leaving money only for a safe withdrawal of US troops. Failed, 97-322
Jul 07, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
House turns up the heat on Afghanistan withdrawal (RC #373)
Almost every House Democrat and 26 Republicans voted for the McGovern-Jones amendment requiring the president to develop a plan for accelerated military withdrawal from Afghanistan. The amendment fell just 6 votes short of passing, and the next day headlines read that Congress had signaled to the White House rapidly growing support for withdrawal. Failed, 204-215
May 26, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Withdrawing ground troops from Afghanistan (RC #364)
President Obama doubled the number of troops in Afghanistan to fuel a doomed counterinsurgency operation. This amendment would have required a plan to remove all ground troops except those involved in small counterterrorism operations. Failed, 123-294
May 26, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Troops out by the end of the year (RC #193)
Invoking the War Powers Act, Rep. Dennis Kucinich’s (D-OH) bill would have directed the president to remove troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2011. Failed, 93-321
Mar 17, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
An orderly Afghanistan withdrawal (RC #91)
Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) amendment would have limited funding for the nearly 10-year-old war in Afghanistan to $10 billion for a safe and orderly withdrawal of US troops. Failed, 98-331
Feb 18, 2011FailedYeacheckmark

Arms sales

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Preventing the transfer of cluster bombs to Saudi Arabia (RC #327)
H.Amdt.1212 to H.R.5293. Rep. John Conyers’ (D-MI) amendment would have blocked funds from being used to transfer or authorize the transfer of cluster munitions to Saudi Arabia. Failed, 204-216.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark

Counterterrorism

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting funds from being used for the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) after April 30, 2017 (RC #330)
H.Amdt.1216 to H.R.5293. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have prohibited funds from being used for the 2001 AUMF after April 30, 2017. With no expiration date, no geographic limitations, and vague language around acceptable targets, the 2001 AUMF has served as a blank check for war for the executive branch, allowing Congress to shirk one of its most important duties: to debate and vote on whether or not we go to war. Failed, 146-274.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting funds from being used for engaging U.S. Armed Forces in combat operations in Iraq or Syria until an Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) authorizing those operations is passed (RC #329)
H.Amdt.1215 to H.R.5293. Rep. Jim McGovern’s (D-MA) amendment would have prohibited funds from being used for the engagement of U.S. Armed Forces in any combat operation in Iraq or Syria until an AUMF is enacted authorizing such operations. Failed, 135-285.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Repealing the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) (RC #210)
H.Amdt.1033 to H.R.4909. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have repealed the outdated, 2001 AUMF. With no expiration date, no geographic limitations, and vague language around acceptable targets, the 2001 AUMF has served as a blank check for war for the executive branch, allowing Congress to shirk one of its most important duties: to debate and vote on whether or not we go to war. Failed, 138-285.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Withdrawing troops from Iraq and Syria (RC #370)
H.Con.Res.55. Rep. Jim McGovern’s (D-MA) resolution would have directed the President to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq and Syria who were deployed on or after August 7, 2014, other than troops needed to protect U.S. diplomatic missions and personnel, within 30 days of passage of the resolution, or if the President decided it was not safe to withdraw troops in that period, no later than December 31, 2015. Failed, 139-288.
Jun 17, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Sunsetting the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) (RC #347)
H.Amdt.482 to H.R.2685. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have blocked funding for the 2001 AUMF after December 31, 2015. Lee explained that the 2001 AUMF had (at the time) been used “more than 30 times to justify military action and other activities, including warrantless surveillance and wiretapping, indefinite detention practices at GTMO, targeted killing operations using lethal drones, and the open-ended expansion of military operations abroad, which have nothing to do with the original congressional intent.” Failed, 157-270.
Jun 11, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Ending the forever war (RC #237)
Rep. Adam Schiff’s (D-CA) amendment would have sunset the authorization for military force (AUMF) passed by Congress way back in 2001. The AUMF has been used to target suspected terrorists all around the globe, far beyond what Congress expected when voting 13 years ago. Failed, 191-233.
May 22, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
Ending indefinite detention (RC #234)
This bipartisan amendment by Reps. Smith (D-WA) and Broun (R-GA) would have ended the shameful practice of indefinite detention and brought detainees to trial in the US. Failed, 191-230.
May 22, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
Still trying to close Guantanamo (RC #233)
Rep. Smith’s (D-WA) amendment provided a framework for the long overdue task of closing the Guantamano Bay prison. Failed, 177-247.
May 22, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
Blocking NSA overreach (RC #412)
Rep. Amash's (R-MI) closely watched amendment would have blocked blanket collection of metadata--information related to phone calls--requiring a suspicion of terrorist activity. The amendment came on the heels of revelations about the NSA's overreach to monitor all Americans, and came within a handful of votes of passing. Failed, 205-217.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Ending the authorization for the forever war (RC #410)
Rep. Schiff's (D-CA) amendment would have prohibited funding for the use of force under the Authorization for Use of Military Force passed in September 2001 at the end of 2014--the date combat operations are set to end in Afghanistan. The administration has revealed a disturbingly broad interpretation of the AUMF and used it as justification for lethal attacks around the world. Repealing the AUMF is an important step in reining in the drone war. Failed, 185-236.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Stop wasting money on Guantanamo construction (RC #409)
This amendment would have prevented further construction or expansion of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Failed, 187-237.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Ending the unjust detention of innocent people (RC #408)
Rep. Nadler's (D-NY) amendment would have prohibited the continued detention of Guantanamo Bay prisoners who had been cleared for release. Failed, 176-242.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
A plan to close Guantanamo (RC #237)
Rep. Smith's (D-WA) amendment would have provided a framework for closing the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, a move that is well overdue for the sake of human rights and the US's global reputation. Failed, 174-249.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Roadblocks to closing Guantanamo (RC #236)
Rep. Walorski (R-IN) offered this amendment to prohibit funding to transfer Guantanamo detainees to Yemen. Returning detainees who have not been charged to their home countries is an important step to closing the Guantanamo detention facility. Passed, 236-188.
Jun 14, 2013Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Ending indefinite detention (RC #228)
Rep. Smith's (D-WA) amendment attempted to undo previous dangerous provisions that allow indefinite military detention of people detained under the authorization for use of military force in the United States or it possessions or territories. Failed, 200-226.
Jun 13, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Money for war and violating civil liberties (RC #645)
The final version of the National Defense Authorization Act was stripped of Senate provisions that limited indefinite detention. The bill also authorizes billions of dollars for the continuing war in Afghanistan and wasteful Pentagon and nuclear weapons programs. Passed, 315-107
Dec 20, 2012PassedNaycheckmark
Eliminating indefinite detention (RC #270)
Civil libertarians in Congress have been trying to undo dangerous provisions from last year’s National Defense Authorization Act that authorize indefinite detention of terrorism suspects. Reps. Adam Smith (D-WA) and Justin Amash’s (R-MI) bipartisan amendment would have eliminated indefinite detention for people captured in the United States or its territories or possessions. Failed, 182-238
May 18, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Blocking civilian trials for terrorism suspects (RC #266)
Rep. Tom Rooney’s (R-FL) amendment continues an ongoing counterproductive push to block civilian trials for suspected terrorists. Passed, 249-171
May 17, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Money for wars, weapons, and obliterating civil rights (RC #932)
Not only did the Defense Authorization bill, deemed a “must-pass” piece of legislation because it authorized all funds for the Pentagon for 2012, include funding for wasteful wars and weapons systems—it also codified support for indefinite detention (without civil trial) for terrorism suspects and left open the possibility for indefinite detention of US citizens. Passed, 283-136
Dec 14, 2011PassedNaycheckmark
Blocking endless war against an ill-defined target (RC #361)
The House Armed Services Committee snuck language into the Defense Authorization bill to expand the definition of the authorization for use of military force. This included expanding authority to militarily target and indefinitely detain anyone considered to be a member of Al Qaeda, the Taliban, or “associated forces”, until the end of the “war on terror.” After Rep. Garamendi tried and failed to remove the language in committee, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) offered this amendment on the floor to strike the language. Failed, 187-234
May 26, 2011FailedYeacheckmark

International cooperation

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Attacking the United Nations (RC #107)
A group of Republicans went on a tear against the United Nations in 2011. This amendment by Rep. Paul Broun (R-GA) would have prohibited use of funds to pay UN dues. Failed, 177-243
Feb 19, 2011FailedNaycheckmark

Iran

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Impeding sanctions relief for Iran (RC #533)
H.R.3457. Rep. Patrick Meehan’s (R-PA) resolution would have prevented the lifting of nuclear related sanctions against Iran -- sanctions the the Iran Agreement specifies will be lifted -- until Iran paid for judgements against it levied in U.S. courts for acts of terrorism. Not only was this bill designed to block implementation of the Iran Nuclear Agreement, it was also redundant since the agreement did nothing to prevent terrorism related sanctions against Iran. The Senate never voted on this resolution. Passed, 251-173.
Oct 01, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Vote for approval of the Iran Nuclear Agreement (RC #493)
H.R.3461. Despite the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act not requiring approval for the Iran Agreement to move forward, republican leadership held a vote of approval in order to demonstrate that a majority of Congress opposed the agreement and to put democrats on record in favor of the agreement so they could use that against them in the 2016 election. Failed, 162-269.
Sep 11, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Claiming that the President did not comply with the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act (RC #492)
H.Res.411. Rep. Mike Pompeo’s (R-KS) resolution claimed that the President did not comply with the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act because he did not submit to Congress agreements made between the government of Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The resolution claimed that the IAEA agreements with Iran constituted side agreements within the Iran Nuclear Agreement, while the Obama administration contended that those agreements were separate from the Iran Nuclear Agreement. The resolution claimed that because the President had supposedly not followed the terms of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act, the 60-day congressional review period had not actually started. Had that been the case, implementation of the agreement would have been delayed, which Iran would have likely see as a violation of the agreement. Passed, 245-186.
Sep 10, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Undermining diplomacy with unnecessary sanctions (RC #427)
This counterproductive vote on additional sanctions on Iran came after the election of Hassan Rouhani raised hopes for reinvigorated negotiations. Passing sanctions right before Rouhani's inauguration sent the wrong message. If Congress continues this ill-advised approach, it could undermine the delicate diplomatic opportunity. Passed, 400-20.
Jul 31, 2013PassedYeaxmark
A special envoy to jumpstart negotiations (RC #285)
Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have appointed a special envoy for ensure all diplomatic avenues with Iran were pursued. Failed, 77-344
May 18, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Lowering the threshold for war (RC #261)
The House overwhelmingly passed this irresponsible bill that tries to move the red line for military action against Iran (see 2012 Highs and Lows). Passed, 401-11
May 17, 2012PassedPresent--
Outlawing diplomacy with Iran, and more foolhardy sanctions (RC #927)
In this lopsided vote, the House showed once again how out of touch they are with reality. The bill included a jaw-dropping prohibition on diplomatic contact with Iran, unless the administration certifies to Congress — with 15 days notice — that such contact is necessary. The bill could have dire consequences in a crisis situation. It also included additional unilateral sanctions unlikely to deal effectively with concerns about Iran’s nuclear program. Passed, 410-11
Dec 14, 2011PassedYeaxmark

Iraq

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting the President from deploying or maintaining U.S. troops in a sustained combat role in Iraq without authorization from Congress (RC #452)
H.Con.Res.105. Rep. Jim McGovern’s (D-MA) concurrent resolution prohibits the President from deploying or maintaining U.S. troops in a sustained combat role in Iraq without authorization from Congress after the enactment of this resolution. It was referred to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee never to be heard from again. Passed 370-40.
Jul 25, 2014PassedNot Voting--
Blocking funding for the 2002 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) (RC #326)
H.Amdt.912 to H.R.4870. Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have prohibited funds from being used for the 2002 Iraq War AUMF. Like the 2001 AUMF, the 2002 AUMF has no expiration date, which has allowed for continued military operations in Iraq without a debate in Congress. Failed 182-231.
Jun 20, 2014FailedYeacheckmark

Libya

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting funds for use of force in Libya (RC #514)
The war in Libya was started without Congressional authorization and funded off the books. This amendment by Rep. Amash would have prohibited funding for the use of force in Libya. Failed, 199-229
Jul 07, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting military assistance to opposition in Libya (RC #513)
History shows that when the US or other world powers fuel regional conflicts with weapons, those conflicts often erupt into protracted, intensely brutal wars. In this case, it could have made a delicate situation more dangerous for the Libyan people. This amendment prohibited funding for providing US military training and equipment to the Libyan opposition forces. Passed, 225-201
Jul 07, 2011Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Authorizing use of force in Libya -- after the fact (RC #493)
The Obama administration went ahead with military action in Libya without any authorization from Congress, undermining their powers of oversight. Unfortunately, many members of Congress were too willing to shirk that oversight role. This attempt to retroactively authorize the use of force faced bipartisan opposition. Neither the Senate nor the House ever officially authorized the war in Libya. Failed, 123-295
Jun 24, 2011FailedNaycheckmark

Nuclear weapons

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Cutting $75 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #309)
H.Amdt.1187 to H.R.5293. Rep. Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) amendment would have cut $75,802,000 from the LRSO, a new nuclear cruise missile that is redundant, expensive, and destabilizing. Failed, 159-261.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would prevent the dismantlement of nuclear warheads that were retired in 2007 (RC #237)
H.Amdt.231 to H.R.1735. Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) amendment would have removed language from the NDAA that delayed for 5 years the dismantlement of nuclear warheads that were retired in 2007. Nadler explained the absurdity of the language that his amendment sought to strike: “We have about 5,000 active nuclear warheads, and 2,000 would suffice to destroy the entire world. Why waste money maintaining retired warheads beyond the 5,000 active warheads sufficient to destroy the world two and a half times over?” Failed, 178-242.
May 15, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting funds for new nuclear submarines from being drawn from the Navy’s slush fund, and returning slush fund money to the regular Navy budget (RC #235)
H.Amdt.227 to H.R.1735. Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s (D-OR) amendment would have required funding for the new Ohio-class nuclear submarines to come from the Navy’s regular budget as opposed to a Navy slush fund called the National Sea-Based Deterrent Fund. The amendment also would have transferred money from the National Sea-Based Deterrent Fund back into the regular Navy budget. Like the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget, the Sea-Based Deterrence Fund allows the Navy to circumvent legislated budget caps and reduces transparency. Failed, 43-375.
May 15, 2015FailedNayxmark
Limiting funding for implementation of the New START Treaty (RC #234)
H.Amdt.226 to H.R.1735. Rep. Doug Lamborn’s (R-CO) amendment prevented Department of Defense funding from being used to implement the New Start Treaty, an agreement between the U.S. and Russia to reduce their nuclear arsenals. Passed, 235-182.
May 15, 2015Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Cutting $25 million from the life extension program for the warhead for the new nuclear cruise missile (RC #204)
H.Amdt.181 to H.R.2028. Rep. John Garamendi’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut $25 million from a life extension program for the W80 warhead for a new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO). The bill that this amendment applied to accelerated the life extension program for the W80 warhead by two years, moving the acquisition date from 2027 to 2025, despite the fact that the current nuclear armed cruise missile and its accompanying warhead aren’t slated for retirement until the 2030s. In other words, the House voted to waste taxpayer dollars on accelerating plans to build a redundant and destabilizing nuclear cruise missile and warhead. Failed, 149-272.
May 01, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Cutting $167 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #203)
H.Amdt.180 to H.R.2028. Rep. Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) amendment would have cut $167,050,000 from the LRSO, a new nuclear cruise missile that is redundant, expensive, and destabilizing. Failed, 164-257.
May 01, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
Cutting $7.6 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #384)
H.Amdt.1005 to H.R.4923. Rep. Mike Quigley’s (D-IL) amendment would have cut $7.6 million from the LRSO and put that money towards a deficit reduction account. Failed 181-239.
Jul 10, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
Wasting money on nuclear missiles (RC #320)
Rep. Nadler (D-NY) offered this amendment to strike language that required wasting money on expensive nuclear missile solos. But representatives in those states fight hard to keep the money flowing, and the amendment was defeated. Failed, 187-233.
Jun 19, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
Cutting $3.4 million from the new nuclear cruise missile, known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO) (RC #319)
H.Amdt.885 to H.R.4870. Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s (D-OR) amendment would have cut $3.4 million from the LRSO — a destabilizing, expensive, duplicative, new nuclear cruise missile — and put that money towards environmental restoration. Failed 179-242.
Jun 19, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
A real accounting of the cost of nuclear weapons (RC #238)
Rep. Blumenauer’s (D-OR) amendment requires annual updates on the cost estimate of maintaining our bloated nuclear arsenal. Nuclear hawks on the committee fought the amendment because the truth about nuclear weapons spending shows that we are on an unsustainable path. Passed, 224-199.
May 22, 2014Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Clinging to the Cold War (RC #236)
Rep. Lamborn’s (D-CO) amendment shows a refusal to come to terms with the fact that our nuclear weapons arsenal is shrinking. The amendment puts unrealistic restrictions on funding for implementing the New START treaty to lower the number of nuclear weapons held by the US and Russia. The Senate is unlikely to approve this provision in their version of the bill. Passed, 233-191.
May 22, 2014Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would terminate a requirement that ICMB silos remain in at least warm status (RC #227)
H.Amdt.669 to H.R.4435. Rep. Steve Daines’ (R-MT) amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act removed language that would have ended the requirement that ICBM silos remain in at least warm status. Passed 222-196.
May 21, 2014Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Allowing the Department of Defense (DoD) to transfer funds to nuclear nonproliferation efforts (RC #226)
H.Amdt.666 to H.R.4435. Rep. Loretta Sanchez’s (D-CA) amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act would have given the DoD the authority to transfer funds to nuclear nonproliferation programs that work to reduce the spread of nuclear weapons and keep nuclear material safe and secure. Failed 194-227.
May 21, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
No shutdown for nukes (RC #542)
While refusing to vote on a clean bill to fund the whole government, the House passed a bill to fund nuclear weapons programs. Millions of people are suffering from lack of government services due to the shutdown, but this bill prioritized the wasteful nuclear weapons budget. The Senate has no immediate plans to take up the bill. Passed, 248-176.
Oct 11, 2013PassedNaycheckmark
Cut funds to tinker with nuclear weapons (RC #334)
Rep. Polis' (D-CO) amendment would have cut $13 million in funds for a program to extend the life of the W76 nuclear warhead. Failed, 182-243.
Jul 10, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Robbing nonproliferation to buy more weapons (RC #333)
Rep. Joe Heck's (R-NV) amendment would have pulled money for crucial nonproliferation programs to pad the already bloated nuclear weapons budget. Failed, 86-338.
Jul 10, 2013FailedNaycheckmark
Reining in the wasteful B61 nuclear bomb (RC #332)
The unnecessary B61 nuclear bomb Life Extension Program is projected to cost at least $10 billion. This amendment, offered by Reps. Quigley (D-IL) and Polis (D-CO) would have cut excess funding for the program added by the committee. Failed, 196-227.
Jul 10, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Funding to reduce the nuclear arsenal (RC #233)
Rep. Rick Larsen's (D-WA) amendment would have reinstated funding cut by the committee for implementing the New START treaty to reduce our nuclear arsenal. Failed, 195-229.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Hawks make sure we can still drop nuclear bombs (RC #493)
Rep. Rick Berg’s (R-ND) amendment prohibits use of funds to reduce the submarines, planes, and missiles available to deliver nuclear weapons. Passed, 232-183
Jul 19, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Wasting billions to preserve a massive nuclear arsenal (RC #491)
Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH) has been one of the leading nuclear hawks in the House. With this amendment, he proposed prohibiting funding for reductions of our nuclear arsenal to implement the president’s new nuclear policy or to modify deployment plans. Passed, 235-178
Jul 19, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Reducing nuclear missiles in our communities (RC #482)
The US currently has 450 intercontinental ballistic missiles deployed throughout the country. Rep. Ed Markey's (D-MA) reasonable amendment would have prohibited funding for maintaining more than 300. Failed, 136-283
Jul 18, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Reining in the bloated nuclear weapons budget (RC #332)
Despite a serious financial crunch, the nuclear weapons budget continues to grow. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) tried to bring some sense to nuclear weapons funding with this amendment that would have cut $298 million. Failed 138-281
Jun 06, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Funding the right nuclear priorities (RC #331)
Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) tried for an even bigger increase in the successful Global Threat Reduction Initiative nonproliferation program with an amendment to transfer $16 million. Failed, 182-237
Jun 06, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Money for effective nonproliferation (RC #325)
This amendment transferred $17 million for the wasteful and dangerous Mixed-Oxide Fuel facility to proven nonproliferation programs (see 2012 Highs and Lows). Passed, 328-89
Jun 06, 2012Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Billions to deploy nuclear bombs (RC #288)
Rep. Denny Rehberg’s (R-MT) amendment requires maintaining all three legs of the costly triad for deploying nuclear weapons, and requires multiple certifications to reduce our strategic nuclear arsenal. Passed, 238-162
May 18, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Tying up crucial nonproliferation funding (RC #286)
Rep. Trent Franks’ (R-AZ) amendment limits nonproliferation funding for Russia until the State Department certifies that Russia is not aiding Syria, Iran or North Korea. With dangerous loose nuclear material still unsecured around the world, messing with nonproliferation programs is the wrong way to send a message to Russia. Passed, 241-181
May 18, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Clinging to Cold War nuclear weapons (RC #280)
Some members of Congress just canâ't let go of our oversized nuclear arsenal. Rep. Tom Price’s (R-GA) amendment blocks the president from making any unilateral agreements to reduce nuclear weapons. Passed, 241-179
May 18, 2012Agreed ToNaycheckmark
No need for a new nuclear bomber (RC #268)
Congress could have saved $291 million by passing Rep. Ed Markey’s (D-MA) amendment to delay the development of a new nuclear bomber by 10 years. Failed, 112-308
May 17, 2012FailedYeacheckmark

Pentagon spending

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Prohibiting the use of Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funds for anything other than contingency operations (RC #323)
H.Amdt.1206 to H.R.5293. The OCO budget is a Pentagon slush fund that allows the Pentagon to surpass budget caps that other government programs are bound to, and allows the Pentagon to be less transparent in how it spends taxpayer money. Rep. Mick Mulvaney’s (R-SC) amendment would have prevented OCO funding from being used for normal Pentagon operations in an attempt to reduce the OCO’s utility as a slush fund. Failed, 112-306.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting the use of funds for transferring prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to their country of origin or any other foreign country (RC #319)
H.Amdt.1202 to H.R.5293. Rep. Doug Lamborn’s (R-CO) amendment prohibits the use of funds for transferring prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to their countries of origin or any other foreign country. This amendment combined with language in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that prevents funds from being used to transfer Guantanamo Bay prisoners to the U.S. makes it virtually impossible to close the Guantanamo Bay Prison with money appropriated for Fiscal Year 2017. Passed, 245-175.
Jun 16, 2016Agreed ToNaycheckmark
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2017 (RC #216)
H.R.4909. The FY 2017 NDAA includes incredibly problematic programs like Pentagon slush funds (namely the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget and the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund), the F-35 fighter jet, and the new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO), among others. Passed, 277-147.
May 19, 2016PassedNaycheckmark
Reducing the Pentagon slush fund by roughly $9.44 billion (RC #213)
H.Amdt.1037 to H.R.4909. Rep. Keith Ellison’s (D-MN) amendment would have cut $9,440,300,000 from the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget. The OCO budget is a Pentagon slush fund that allows the Pentagon to surpass budget caps that other government programs are bound to, and allows the Pentagon to be less transparent in how it spends taxpayer money. Failed, 132-289.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Reducing the base Department of Defense budget by 1% (RC #211)
H.Amdt.1034 to H.R.4909. Rep. Jared Polis’ (D-CO) amendment would have reduced the base Department of Defense budget by 1%, excluding military/reserve/National Guard personnel and the Defense Health Program account. Failed, 63-360.
May 19, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would prevent funds from being used to close Guantanamo Bay Prison (RC #204)
H.Amdt.1016 to H.R.4909. Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) amendment would have removed sections from the NDAA that prohibit funds from being used to transfer prisoners from Guantanamo Bay Prison to the United States, and from being used to construct or expand any facilities in the U.S. for the purpose of housing Guantanamo Bay detainees. Failed, 163-259.
May 18, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Removing language from the Department of Defense Appropriations Act that would prohibit the transfer of funds to the Navy’s slush fund (RC #339)
H.Amdt.471 to H.R.2685. Rep. Randy Forbes’ (R-VA) amendment to the Department of Defense Appropriations bill removed language that would have prohibited the transfer of funds to the Navy’s slush fund, known as the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund. Passed 321-111.
Jun 11, 2015Agreed ToYeaxmark
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2016 (RC #239)
H.R.1735. The FY 2016 NDAA includes incredibly problematic programs like Pentagon slush funds (namely the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget and the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund), the F-35 fighter jet, and the new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO), among others. Passed, 269-151.
May 15, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Reducing the required number of operational aircraft carriers that the Navy must maintain from 11 to 10 (RC #228)
H.Amdt.217 to H.R.1735. Rep. Jared Polis’ (D-CO) amendment would have lowered the required number of operational aircraft carriers the Navy must maintain from 11 to 10. Failed, 60-363.
May 14, 2015FailedNayxmark
Removing language from the Consolidated Appropriations Act that would use the Pentagon’s slush fund to provide funding for certain military construction projects (RC #186)
H.Amdt.125 to H.R.2029. Rep. Mike Mulvaney’s (R-SC) amendment would have removed language from the Consolidated Appropriations Act that provided funding for certain military construction projects from the Pentagon’s slush fund, known as the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget. Failed, 190-231.
Apr 30, 2015FailedYeacheckmark
A budget that would leave us better off (RC #173)
The Congressional Progressive Caucus offered their Better Off Budget, a moral document that reflects how most Americans want to see their tax dollars spent. It would have reduced wasteful weapons spending and created 8.8 million jobs by 2017 through investments in education, infrastructure and research. Failed, 89-327.
Apr 09, 2014FailedYeacheckmark
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2015 (RC #116)
H.R.3979. The FY 2015 NDAA includes incredibly problematic programs like Pentagon slush funds (namely the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) budget and the National Sea Based Deterrence Fund), the F-35 fighter jet, and the new nuclear cruise missile known as the Long Range Standoff Weapon (LRSO), among others. Passed 410-0.
Mar 11, 2014PassedYeaxmark
Success in cutting wasteful war funding (RC #403)
After the committee added additional funding to the war account, a bipartisan group offered an amendment to cut $3.5 billion. Passed, 215-206.
Jul 24, 2013Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Limiting missiles in our backyard (RC #397)
Rep. Quigley's (D-IL) amendment would have limited funding to maintaining no more than 300 intercontinental ballistic missiles. Failed, 142-283.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Chipping away at Pentagon spending (RC #396)
Reps. Lee (D-CA), Blumenauer (D-OR), Schrader (D-OR), Conyers (D-MI) and Polis (D-CO) offered this amendment to make a modest 1% cut in the Pentagon budget. Failed, 109-317.
Jul 24, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Prohibiting contract with Assad's arms dealer (RC #390)
This amendment cuts funds for a contract to buy helicopters for the Afghan Security Forces from Rosoboronexport, a Russian arms contractor that is supplying the Assad government with weapons. Passed, 346-79.
Jul 24, 2013Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Missile defense money the Pentagon doesn't want (RC #384)
This amendment would have cut $70.2 million the committee added for a wasteful East Coast missile defense site that the Pentagon doesn't want to build. Failed, 173-249.
Jul 23, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Reducing funding for submarines (RC #382)
Reps. Blumenauer (D-OR) and Conyers (D-MI) offered this amendment to reduce funding for the Ohio-class submarine by 10%, to help the Pentagon get in line with sequestration spending limits. Failed, 49-372.
Jul 23, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Funding for missile interceptors (RC #381)
Rep. Polis' (D-CO) amendment would have cut funding for 14 ground-based missile interceptors in Alaska and puts the savings toward deficit reduction. Failed, 141-272.
Jul 23, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Eliminating extra war funding (RC #240)
The House Armed Services Committee added $5 billion for the Overseas Contingency Operations budget, which funds the war in Afghanistan. Rep. Van Hollen's (D-MD) amendment would have taken away the increase. Failed, 191-232.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Cutting wasteful missile defense funding (RC #239)
Rep. Polis's (D-CO) amendment would have reduced funding for inefficient ground-based missile interceptors. Failed, 146-278.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Reducing troops in Europe (RC #235)
Reps. Coffman (R-CO) and Polis (D-CO) offered this amendment to save money by reducing the number of troops in Europe. Failed, 110-313.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Reining in out of control Pentagon spending (RC #232)
Rep. Nolan's (D-MN) amendment would have cut $60 billion from the Pentagon budget, bringing it closer to caps set by Congress and eliminating waste. Failed, 71-353.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Using sports to promote the military (RC #231)
Rep. McCollum's (D-MN) amendment would have prohibited funding for the Army National Guard to sponsor wrestling and motor sports. Failed, 134-290.
Jun 14, 2013FailedNayxmark
Ready to launch (RC #223)
Rep. Lummis's (R-WY) amendment to waste money to keep missile silos on "warm status," so they could be used quickly, is a favorite of nuclear hawks and politicians with intercontinental missiles based in their states. Passed, 235-189.
Jun 13, 2013Agreed ToNaycheckmark
Saving money on aircraft carriers (RC #222)
Congress passed legislation requiring the Navy to have 11 aircraft carriers, even though they only have ten. Eliminating this requirement could have saved money, but Congress failed to pass this common sense measure. Failed, 106-318.
Jun 13, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
A smarter alternative budget (RC #85)
The Congressional Progressive Caucus offered this alternative to the House Republicans' budget. The budget would have created jobs and invested in communities, while lowering Pentagon spending to 2006 levels. Failed, 84-327.
Mar 20, 2013FailedYeacheckmark
Freeze the Pentagon budget (RC #495)
Reps. Barney Frank (D-MA) and Mick Mulvaney (R-SC) came together to corral bipartisan support for freezing the Pentagon budget at the previous year’s levels, cutting $1.1 billion. Passed, 247-167
Jul 19, 2012Agreed ToNot Voting--
Cut funding to keep troops in Europe (RC #492)
Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CO) offered this amendment to prohibit funding for 2 permanent brigades in Europe, moving along the overdue process of decreasing the US military presence in Europe. Failed, 123-292.
Jul 19, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Holding Congress to budget caps (RC #489)
This amendment was another attempt to bring the Pentagon budget back down to the caps that Congress had imposed, cutting $7.6 billion. Failed, 171-243
Jul 19, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Isn't $500 billion enough? (RC #488)
Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut $19 billion from the Pentagon budget, bringing it down to a round $500 billion. Failed, 87-326
Jul 19, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
More missile defense than the Pentagon wants (RC #477)
Rep. Ed Markey’s (D-CO) amendment would have reduced missile defense funding by $75 million, bringing it back down to the amount requested in the Pentagon budget. Failed, 150-268
Jul 18, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Bipartisan support for getting troops out of Europe (RC #284)
In a rare bipartisan victory, the House passed Reps. Jared Polis (D-CO) and Mike Coffman’s (R-CO) amendment to reduce Brigade Combat Teams in Europe. Passed, 226-196
May 18, 2012Agreed ToYeacheckmark
Ignoring Congress's limits on Pentagon spending (RC #282)
After the super committee failed, the House passed the Budget Control Act, which included spending caps. Republicans on the Armed Services Committee then ignored this and put forward a bill with $8 billion in additional Pentagon spending above the cap. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut the extra funds. Failed, 170-252
May 18, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Scale back the missile defense boondoggle (RC #269)
Reps. Jared Polis (D-CO) and Loretta Sanchez’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut $403 million from ground-based midcourse missile defense. Failed, 170-252
May 17, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Robbing the poor to pay the Pentagon (RC #247)
In a stunning move that showed how out of touch congressional leaders are with our real economic needs, the House passed this bill to stop cuts to the Pentagon by gutting funding for food stamps and other social programs. Passed, 218-199
May 10, 2012PassedNaycheckmark
A budget for the people (RC #148)
The Congressional Progressive Caucus offered this alternative to the federal budget, which would end the war in Afghanistan and cut wasteful Pentagon and nuclear weapons spending. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman praised it as a sensible solution to our budget woes. Failed, 78-346
Mar 29, 2012FailedYeacheckmark
Bring them home -- from Europe (RC #529)
Decades after any major ground war in Europe, tens of thousands of US troops are still stationed there. Rep. Jared Polis’ (D-CO) amendment prohibited funding for keeping more than 30,000 permanent military personnel in Europe. Failed, 113-307
Jul 08, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
How about just a smaller increase in military spending? (RC #523)
Despite the environment of budget austerity, in 2011 Congress put the influence of weapons contractors on full display, and underscored the need for work to send pro-peace leaders to Congress in 2012. The Obama administration asked for a $17 billion increase in Pentagon spending for Fiscal Year 2012. Rep. Barney Frank’s (D-MA) amendment would have cut that increase in half. Failed, 181-244
Jul 07, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
The Pentagon slush fund (RC #506)
Rep. Barbara Lee’s amendment challenged deficit hawks to put their money where their mouths are by voting to cut the Pentagon’s $5 billion war slush fund. Failed, 114-314
Jul 07, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
21st century money for a 20th century nuclear bomber (RC #499)
The Air Force's new $297 million nuclear bomber program is obsolete right from the drawing board. Rep. Peter Welch’s (D-VT) amendment would have cut the program. The world has changed since the Cold War, and the new bomber is out of step with America's real needs. Failed, 98-322
Jul 06, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
The growing Star Wars boondoggle (RC #369)
The Pentagon requested an exorbitant $10 billion for the missile defense program, but the House Armed Services Committee wanted to spend more on the failed program. Rep. Loretta Sanchez’s (D-CA) amendment would have cut the additional $100 million tacked on by the committee. Failed, 184-234
May 26, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
The deficit double standard (RC #128)
When Republican leaders proposed cutting every federal budget back to 2008 levels, they made one exception: the Pentagon budget. Reps. Barbara Lee (D-CA) and Pete Stark (D-CA) tried to address this double standard with an amendment to cut back the bloated Pentagon budget to the same levels. Failed, 76-344
Feb 19, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Military pork (RC #102)
This amendment would have slashed funding for the EFV (see #3) as well as the surface-launched air-to-air missile program. Failed, 123-306
Feb 18, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Faulty weapons systems (RC #80)
This amendment would have prohibited funds to research, develop, test, or purchase the V-22 Osprey (see #1) or the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV), an expensive amphibious assault vehicle that breaks down on average every eight hours. Failed, 91-339
Feb 17, 2011FailedYeacheckmark
Two engines for every plane (RC #46)
The alternate engine program for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is a cash cow for weapons companies, building a 2nd engine model for a plane that already has one. Despite the deficit-cutting rhetoric, Congress kept voting down efforts to trim Pentagon waste. But on the F-35, reason prevailed and the House voted to cut $450 million for the program. Passed, 233-198
Feb 16, 2011Agreed ToYeacheckmark
A costly and crash-prone war plane (RC #43)
The V-22 Osprey had so many cost and safety problems that even Dick Cheney tried to kill the program in the 1980s. But several presidents and lawmakers have kept this aircraft alive, despite ballooning costs and crashes that killed 30 soldiers before the plane even saw combat. This amendment would have cut the funding in the 2012 budget. Failed, 105-326.
Feb 16, 2011FailedYeacheckmark

Syria

Issue Date Bill Outcome Vote Score
Preventing funds from being used to arm and/or train Syrian rebels (RC #328)
H.Amdt.1214 to H.R.5293. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s (D-HI) amendment would have prevented funds from being used for arming and/or training Syrian rebels. Failed, 135-283.
Jun 16, 2016FailedYeacheckmark
Shutting our doors to refugees from Iraq and Syria (RC #643)
H.R.4038. Rep. Michael McCaul’s (R-TX) resolution, the so-called “American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act,” would have required the directors of National Intelligence, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FBI certify to Congress that each individual refugee is not a security threat. The requirement that these directors personally sign off on each refugee from Iraq and Syria, of the thousands of Iraqi and Syrian refugees that the U.S. plans to accept, would have wrapped the refugee resettlement program in red tape and effectively prevented refugees from those countries from entering the U.S. Even if these requirements wouldn’t have made the resettlement process impossible, increasing the barriers to refugee resettlement is unnecessary. Refugees are already the most heavily vetted population to enter the country, going through a screening process that on average takes 18-24 months. The Senate never voted on this resolution. Passed, 289-137.
Nov 19, 2015PassedNaycheckmark
Caution with Syria (RC #234)
Reps. Gibson (R-NY) and Garamendi (D-CA) offered this amendment to remove problematic language in the bill that pointed toward a more militaristic approach to Syria including urging President Obama to“fully consider all courses of action to remove President Bashar al-Assad from power” and to enforce his ill-advised “red line.” Failed, 123-301.
Jun 14, 2013FailedYeacheckmark